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Sustainable textile finishing using ozone and nanobubble technologies

Circular

The textile finishing industry gives fabrics and garments their final appearance and properties. It employs traditional processes that are not environmentally friendly. These industrial activities have some environmental consequences, mainly related to the  massive consumption of chemicals and intensive use of water and energy resources, waste-water treatments required, etc. Processes like desizing, bleaching, washing (roll-to-roll systems on fabrics) and dip-coating functionalization or dyeing (batch systems on garments) are currently developed by wet application systems and chemicals that require huge amounts of water and treatment of the waste-water released. The use of alternative chemistry like ozone for fabric treatment in a continuous way, and use of nanobubble technology for garment finishing is able to reduce the chemical consumption – also water consumption – in comparison with traditional systems.

Please cite this article as: Besnik Mehmeti (2018): Sustainable textile finishing using ozone and nanobubble technologies, In: _zine, Online First, online at: https://zine.tcbl.eu/sustainable-textile-finishing-using-ozone-and-nanobubble-technologies/

Methodologies and Tools for Chemicals Management

Transparent, Vol. 3, Issue 1

The use of chemicals is one of the key factors in the sustainability and has a particular relevance in the textile and clothing sector, due not only to the legislation related with chemicals used (specially REACH, CLP and BPR Regulations) but also to clients RSL (restricted substance list) and campaigns from non-governmental organizations, such as the Detox campaign and ZDHC programme.

Please cite this article as: Besnik Mehmeti (2018): Methodologies and Tools for Chemicals Management, In: _zine, Vol. 3, Issue 1, online at: https://zine.tcbl.eu/methodologies-and-tools-for-chemicals-management/

Multiplexed Laser Surface Enhancement

Circular, Vol. 3, Issue 1

Water is used extensively throughout textile processing operations. Almost all dyes, specialty chemicals, and finishing chemicals are applied to textile substrates from water baths. In addition, most fabric preparation steps, including desizing, scouring, bleaching, and mercerizing, use aqueous systems. The…

The Business Case for Short Runs

Human, Vol. 2, Issue 2

Short run production can allow for local sourcing closer to market needs but also presents a number of challenges that can be addressed through TCBL. Short production runs for textiles and clothing materials can be divided into segments, e.g. Short…

Science and Fashion Design

Circular, Online First

Technology related to yarn and fabric production and related to sewing is constantly improving. The textile and clothing sector benefits a lot from research in many disciplines (from chemistry to computer science and biology), but often in a not entirely…

Hotmelt Coating

Circular, Vol. 1, Issue 1

An interesting alternative to water-based recipes preparing yarns for weaving is coating with hotmelts, especially from an energy point of view. Traditional coating of warp yarn is done mostly on water based recipes: single yarns are coated conventionally within a…

Circular economy

Circular, Vol. 1, Issue 1

The Circular Economy model ‘closes the loop’ of industrial supply chains to reintegrate energy and waste by-products into the economic cycle. It thus places the spotlight on the potential of re-use, recycling, and renewable energy sources as part of the…

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